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Old Preston Hollow Neighborhood

Old Preston Hollow Real Estate and Homes for Sale in Preston Hollow Neighborhood

Old Preston Hollow Collage

These pastoral Preston Hollow estate neighborhoods within eight miles of downtown can be traced back to the acquisition John Howell of Mississippi made from the Peters Colony in 1844 near Cochran Chapel. These 546 acres were patented by the state of Texas on June 15, 1857. Over the next 100 years this remote piece of land made of creeks, woods and hollows gradually began to develop as the neighborhood we now know as Preston Hollow. In 1924, between Northwest Highway and Park Lane, 250 acres were dedicated as Preston Hollow. See More

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Preston Hollow Real Estate found in the Preston Hollow Neighborhoods

Neighborhoods of Old Preston Hollow

Jan and I have bought and sold a lot of homes as we have moved around the country and you are the first realtor we have worked with that has actually marketed our home.

- Robert Crandall
Former Chairman and CEO, American Airlines

Map of Old Preston Hollow

Neighborhoods within Old Preston Hollow

Old Preston Hollow is made up of nineteen smaller neighborhoods inside Preston Hollow. Click on the map and discover each specific neighborhood as you explore this area.

Old Preston Hollow Neighborhood - Continued

In 1939 Preston Hollow Township was incorporated to include Preston Hollow, El Parado, Preston Elms, Preston Downs and Preston Highlands. This new township also included Shadywood and Senecca, south of Northwest Highway, that is now known as part of Bluffview. In 1945, with the electoral support of its residents and legislative support of Texas, it merged with the city of Dallas. During these World War II years, when Preston Hollow was a township, it was governed on the principals that permeated the thinking of Dallasites. There were no taxes, but volunteer subscription for police and fire protection. The building permit fees from the rapid growth of the town paid for the rest of the government. In keeping with this Preston Hollow tradition, there are now neighborhood associations that rent off-duty policemen and city police cars to patrol the neighborhood.

These neighborhood associations are spread across an area from Hillcrest to Midway, Walnut Hill to Northwest Highway that is now generally considered Preston Hollow. Here the city’s grandest estate homes have been built, the nation’s finest architects have designed homes, regional architecture has flourished and Dallas architects have left their mark. A rich mix of architectural styles and eras are found in this neighborhood developed in the 20th century on a vast amount of untouched land. The feel of Preston Hollow, in many ways, is the same. Narrow tree-lined streets without sidewalks or parkways create a rural ambience just seven miles from the central business district down the toll road. Large tracts of land have been broken up for new houses to be built, and in the late 1990s it became common for several one acre estate lots to be purchased separately and compiled for an even larger single estate home.

Preston Hollow has consistently been a destination for architects and their clients. The result is rich architectural examples from every decade. Charles Dilbeck designed homes on Park Lane and Chatham Hill. Harwell Hamilton Harris and Howard Meyer designed mid-century modern homes side by side for the respective Tobian children and their spouses in the 1950s. On Park Lane in 1957 the Grafs built the most important home designed by Edward Durell Stone. Frank Lloyd Wright followed with a home he designed on Rockbrook. Dallas architect Max Levy designed one of his first homes on Glenleigh Court in the 80s as did Edward Larabee Barnes on Meadowood. Steven Holl designed a home on Rockbrook in the 1990s. At the end of the century Robert Stern and Richard Meier designed contrasting estate homes adjacent to each other on Preston Road. Contemporary Dallas architects who have designed period estate homes in an eclectic style include Cole Smith, Robbie Fusch, Wilson Fuqua, Ted Larson, Bruce Bernbaum and D.C. Broadstone.

To find out more about Preston Hollow and its architect designed homes and individual neighborhoods call Douglas Newby.